Tag Archives: moths

Burnet moths emerge

The first of the burnet moths are starting to emerge from their little cocoon boats on the grass stems at Newborough Warren:

Freshly emerged, the moth pumps up its wings that were crumpled up inside the cocoon.

Freshly emerged, the moth pumps up its wings that were crumpled up inside the cocoon.

They waste no time getting down to business! You can see here the six spots on each fore-wing, giving them their name - six spot burnet.

They waste no time getting down to business! You can almost see here the six spots on each fore-wing, giving them their name – six spot burnet.

This is a bit blurry, but you can see the cocoon that the moth has climbed out of at the top of the picture.

This is a bit blurry, but you can see the cocoon that the moth has climbed out of at the top of the picture.

In flight the moths look comical: their heavy bodies hanging vertically as their wings flutter like mad and they drift slowly across the grasses

In flight the moths look comical: their heavy bodies hanging vertically as their wings flutter like mad and they drift slowly across the grasses

 

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Burrowing bees

The burrowing bees were out in force today along the edge of Newborough Forest. The area is renowned for the little Creeping Willow Bee (Colletes cunicularius ssp celticus) and that may be what these are, I’m not too sure about bees…

Burrowing bee, Newborough forest. Possibly Colletes cunicularius

Burrowing bee, Newborough forest. Possibly Colletes cunicularius

Burrowing bee at Newborough Forest

They were certainly behaving very aggressively, bombing earwigs, bumble bees and pill bugs that crossed their path. The small creeping willows (Salix repens var argentea) are just coming into flower and they were buzzing with bees and hoverflies.

A few longhorn moths were also feeding on the willow flowers. These moths have ridiculously long antennae. The moth in this photo was only about 15mm long, but its antennae must have been about 50mm long.

A longhorn moth on a creeping willow catkin. The red line shows the length of its antenna.

A longhorn moth on a creeping willow catkin. The red line shows the length of its antenna.

It was also very nice to see a peacock butterfly. A few of these had ventured out earlier in the year, before the bitterly cold weather of March set in. Hopefully, we really are heading into spring/summer now and today’s butterflies will fare better than those early ones.

Peacock butterfly

Peacock butterfly