About

Newborough and its forests, dunes and beaches, has the most southerly corner of the diamond shaped Isle of Anglesey.  And it’s the nicest corner…imho.

Have a look around the site and hopefully you’ll agree.  Or maybe you won’t because Anglesey is a fabulous island with so many landscapes in miniature – cliffs, moors, “mountains” (although they’re not really so tall), beaches, forests, marshes, lakes, awesome archaeology, great geology, fantastic architecture…there’s something for everyone here.

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10 thoughts on “About

  1. Sal

    I’m not going to tell anyone about it, so that when I return to the UK, even if it’s just a visit, I can go there and it won’t be over-run with tourists. Selfish? Maybe, but I’m still not going to tell anyone! :)

    Reply
  2. sknicholls

    Thank you for your appreciation of my post. You have some lovely photos on your site and Newborough seems like such an unspoiled place of serenity and beauty. Thank you for sharing

    Reply
  3. Denzil

    I remember visiting Newborough Warren over 40 years ago, armed with my new Wild Flowers identification book (Blamey). I had a wonderful time, identifying all sorts of wild flowers that I had never seen before (coming from the Midlands). And I saw my first ringed plover too. A memorable place. Thanks for sharing your experiences on this blog Kay.

    Reply
  4. wellhopper

    Hi Kay. Do you have any thoughts on tides at Newborough. I have been visiting in all seasons for many years. I may be viewing the past in a partial light, or maybe I was just lucky, but years ago I can’t remember a time when the island was completely cut off by the tide. Over recent years though I have found that the island does become an island at every high tide – indeed on New Years Day last year I was actually caught out and spent a very cold three or four hours waiting to be able to wade back. Is this something that you have noticed or is it just down to my imperfect memory?

    Reply
    1. Kay B Post author

      Mmm, that got me thinking. To be honest, I haven’t especially noticed in relation to Llanddwyn, but I have noticed that the wreck of the Grampian Castle has been clearly visible even when low tides have been quite high (neaps) and that the Cefni and drainage channels at Malltraeth have seemed quite high even when the high tides have been quite low. Which explains nothing other than that things seem different!
      There does seem to have been more sand accumulating on Penrhos Beach and more erosion on Llanddwyn Beach, so I can imagine that the island may well be cut off with less of a tide than it used to be.
      Ignoring wind and swell, I used to consider a low low-tide to be less than a metre and a high high-tide to be more than 5m, but that definitely doesn’t hold any more. So I think you’re right, and things are changing. The beauty of the coast, keeping us on our toes!

      Reply

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