A bale of rubber

I first spotted this bale of rubber washed up a few weeks ago. Today is the first time I’ve been back with a camera.

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A rubber bale on Llanddwyn beach (with my size six foot for scale))

A quick scout round the internet shows that similar bales have washed up on the west coast in England and also in northern France.

A couple of years ago, the BBC ran a feature on rubber slabs that were washing up around the coast and they were traced back to a Japanese ship that sank off the Isles of Scilly in World War One. But those blocks were clearly stamped with the word Tjipetir. It looks like this block at Newborough might once have had some writing on, but it’s long since worn away. So, for the time being, the origins of this year’s beached rubber bales is a mystery.

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No writing is visible on the rubber bale, but the imprinting of what must have been its burlap wrapping is clear to see and quite pretty.

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2 thoughts on “A bale of rubber

  1. George Evans

    Hi Kay, Did this bale come in with the tide or has it been exposed by the dissapearance of sand from our beach. I estimate that an average of 30 tons a day of salt laden sand is blowing through the 14 gaps created by the morons of N.R.W. I would like to know what these parasitic plunderers intend to do about the reinstatement of our beach. Thank you, George Evans.

    Reply

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